GOOD NIGHT, BADDIES Winner! — Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

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The winner of the GOOD NIGHT, BADDIES giveaway is: LILLIAN HECKINGER! Congratulations, Lillian. I will be emailing you shortly. Thanks for entering and I hope everyone will pick up a copy!

via GOOD NIGHT, BADDIES Winner! — Writing for Kids (While Raising Them)

Eating Humble Pie

On Saturday, Aug. 23, I attended the Art Opening Reception, “Inspired Journeys,” at the Prairie Art Alliance to congratulate, especially, one of the exhibitors, E. Vern Taylor.

The work of juried member artists and three featured artists comprised this exhibit: Pam Allen (jewelry), James Johnston (paintings, prints, and photos), and E. Vern Taylor (paintings and pastels). And I had planned to see this exhibit more than six months ago, when Vern Taylor told me of his plan to create images in paint and poetic stories.

So, on Saturday evening, I drove to the reception, parked, and entered the Hoogland Center. Vern Taylor was monopolized in the lobby by friends, family, and/or fellow artists. I turned the opposite direction, first, and entered the gallery.

As a past juried member of the gallery, I was excited by the bustling room and the familiar faces, some whom I had only seen on Facebook this last year. When I turned my attention to the exhibit, I recognized the work of the long-term juried artists and noticed many new names. Ceramics, wood, and 3-D collage complimented the paintings and pastels hung on the walls.

I moved on around to the meet and greet area assigned to the featured artists. Vern would probably be there, I thought.

The printed program gave a brief bio of each of the three. Pam Allen told how she created many art forms before finding that jewelry was her passion. James Johnston cited his faith and appreciation of Native Americans as inspiration for his painting and photography. He had exhibited in Illinois, Indiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

Music spilled over many conversations. I couldn’t see Vern yet. At the opposite end of the featured artists’ area, I joined some folks I knew who were also admiring Vern’s work.

Vern’s bio read, “Since seventh grade, I have loved the process of bringing a painting to fruition.” Vern created each piece in this exhibit as a remembrance of profound inspiration in his life. He added his poetry beside many framed paintings.

I was drawn to Vern’s mysterious painting of a midnight blue night. A golden moon outlined a large tree, and a shimmer of light from above highlighted a flower in the foreground. The grand and bold sea gull was pointed out by many. A large painting of Japanese maple leaf motifs refreshed like a breeze with reds, browns, and lavenders (on this hot and humid night). Vern’s poems I must read again to grasp all that he shares in rendering a beautiful, successful memoir.

No Vern in sight yet, so I talked a few more minutes – well, probably a half hour – and needed a cracker and cheese bite for my growling insides.

Now, alone, I felt my knee (not fully recovered) had tightened and swelled. I said good-by to another dear friend at the top of the stairs and felt the evening had ended.

In my car, after driving three blocks or so down the street, I wanted to know more about Vern’s . . . Yikes! I hadn’t talked to Vern. I hadn’t congratulated E. Vern Taylor or thanked him for all the months of work he put in to ready this exhibit.

So I now ask, publically, for forgiveness, E. Vern Taylor, and eat my humble pie.

If you see Vern, please pass this along: “You accomplished your goal. Yeah! Yours is a magnificent memoir, a truly “Inspired Journey.”