50 PRECIOUS WORDS CONTEST

A friend and author, Vivian Kirkfield viviankirkfield , creator of the “50 Precious Words” contest, inspired me to write a Haiku for children, age 12 and under. Finally, after three tries, I’ve composed an entry to my satisfaction. In the end, it was great fun, Vivian. Thank you. Many stories in 50 words will be posted today on Vivian’s blog.

WINTER RUNNING LATE
by Pamela Miller

Faces peering out
“Why is Jack Frost not about?”
Fog-free window panes

Smelled the weighted air
February never fair
New red sled hangs ‘round

Cloudy, down pouring
Loud, the old Grandpa snoring
Soft, hair white as snow

March teased with flurries
Then shouting, sledding, I burst
Now? It’s April first!

THIS IS A PICTURE BOOK

LITTLE RED GLIDING HOOD

Well, I have favorites. Then I opened the box with author Tara Lazar’s LITTLE RED GLIDING HOOD (pictures by Troy Cummings).

Tara’s Little Red is more savvy than the Little Red Riding Hood of old, but she still wears a red cape, and, she’s on skates!

The reader follows as Little Red swizzles, loops, waltzes, and spins along the frozen enchanted forest trail to Grandma’s house. Grandma, always a good listener, learns that Red needs new skates. She can enter an upcoming competition and win them, but she can’t find a skating partner.

Quoting the book jacket flap, “[she] knows . . . Hansel already has Gretel, the Dish is skating with the Spoon, and the Seven Dwarfs are forming a hockey team instead!”

You’ll get reacquainted with many favorite children’s characters in this delightful fractured tale with a page-turning plot with dazzling illustrations for both boys and girls, and for Grandma’s too. And expect to read it over and over again.

MORE IN AN INTERVIEW HERE: http://sportygirlbooks.blogspot.com

The Game of Lines by Hervé Tullet

Completely in the moment with these delightful children – a perfect school visit, a book of wonder.

The Picture Book Review

I had no idea that a book filled with only bright pink and yellow lines could be so absorbing, and yet it is so easy to lose track of time when playing The Game of Lines.

Each time I look through this book with one of my sons, I find myself oooh’ing and ahhhh’ing over each new image as if I were looking at fireworks.  Each combination of panels is a delightful and enchanting surprise — even after you’ve looked through it a bazillion times.

I’ve been delighted to watch my littlest one flip the split pages, turn the book upside down, and babble to us as he “reads” this book.  When we look through this book together, he’ll do the baby sign for “more” when we’ve come to the end, and I’ll open it back up and look through it with him again and again.

I’ve also been…

View original post 587 more words

PB 14:14 – Top Ten Elements of Picture Book Stories – Word Play

Picture Book author, Vivian Kirkfield, has allowed this reblog of her excellent post today. Wanting to write YOUR BOOK? Check this out.

Picture Books Help Kids Soar

Almost two years ago, I was privileged to travel to Singapore to speak at the 2013 Asian Festival of Children’s Content. I met authors and illustrators from all over the Pacific Rim countries and beyond.

For Day 12 of Christie Wild’s PB 14:14 Challenge, I’m offering one of the books by author/illustrator Christopher Cheng. Not only is he an amazing creator of children’s content, he’s also a stellar speaker at events all over the world – he’ll be presenting at the NESCBWI Conference in Chicago this April…wish I could go!

water-300x257

Title: Water

Author: Christopher Cheng

Illustrator: Susanna Gaho-Quek

Publisher: AFCC Publications

Date: 2013

Word Count: 180 estimated

Top Ten Element: Word Play

 

Opening Lines:

“In the air that we breathe

on ice capped peaks

frozen in time

View original post 137 more words

First There is Grattitude in 2015

for Julie Hedlund’s short program The12 Days of Christmas. The videos are archived and enabled me to participate. One suggestion was to write this post on gratitude. THANKS, Julie.

for TIME spent with family. It’s the real gift that keeps on giving, especially when I’m with any one of 10 grandchildren. The youngest begins pre-school. He has left his presence in my heart and home; thus, this arrangement of the manger scene on 2014 Christmas Eve.

Manager Scene

Manager Scene

for overall good health, in spite of having to continue exercising one knee and reinstate my exercise habit of many years, after repairs this past year.

for my writing habit that continues to prepare me and push me closer to my goal of publishing children’s books.

for travels with spouse to California and Maine.

for new friends and old friends who lift my spirits and who, in SCBWI and 12 x 12, critique my manuscripts.

for faith that holds steadfast, telling me I am not alone, and brings a little magic into the world at Christmas. (See my Christmas poem on my Poetry Page.)

for a sharp physician who confirmed that I need less medication now. YAHOO!

for money – the lack of it shall not, solely, determine my goals.

for a habit that I developed while working under a leader and friend, Pat Easterling, who said to write my to-do list before I go to bed. When I awake, I’ll know what I have to do, even before I make the coffee.

And, on these chilly days, I often think of my mother and grandmother who taught me to cook and clean. I am thankful for choices and opportunities they weren’t afforded. I’m thankful for my cozy home, favorite recipes, and my husband who love my cooking.

The Right Writing Place

Not every day is a writing day, although I agree this is the best way to form such a habit. Thoughts swirl in my mind, a to-do list seems to grow by the hour, and 10 minutes doesn’t seem long enough to compose a single sentence. But today, 10 minutes was just enough to get two ideas down on paper as a “note to self.”

Today is my effort to fashion a writing time again (after surgery, recovery, a long-weekend in Maine, online learning in two great programs, and an excellent SCBWI meeting, and “school’s starting” fun with my grandkids claimed my attention). I make coffee and take half a cookie into a room where music plays low to occupy the side of my brain that is thinking about the carpet, the laundry, the dinner that’s planned out, but will soon need started.

I actually get focused more quickly when my grandson stays the day. By his nap time, my brain is too tired to multi-task. The birds’ conversation out back on the screened-in porch helps, unless a close mower tops the chirping. Sometimes I read a bit first or work on last week’s crossword puzzle.

So, if this is your time, pick up a pen, paper, water or other, and get to your “supportive place” (chair/room/porch). Begin with something you know: the past, family, an issue, a new word (look it up), or the color ____, and describe it using the five senses. You are on your way. From your writing habit, you will develop a strong voice. And, that voice will take you where you need to be.